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AUCD - Poster Symposium 12: Technology, Assistive Technology, & Universal Design

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Tuesday, November 13, 2018 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Location: Congressional C

Session Description

All posters for the AUCD Conference will be presented throughout Monday and Tuesday (this is new in 2018) in a series of Poster Symposia that run at the same time as concurrent sessions. During these 75 minute poster symposia, 12-15 posters on a similar theme will be grouped together in a room. Posters will be displayed on large boards and have a table underneath for accompanying materials. The session will be introduced by a moderator, poster authors will be asked to provide a very brief introduction of their poster, and then attendees will be free to move about the room to speak with poster presenters directly for the remainder of the session. Attendees are also welcome to move between symposia rooms and view posters on other topics. Conference posters submitted ahead of time are also avilable electronically in the conference app and linked below.

 


 

 




Presenters

Recognizing Emotion Intensity and Compound Emotions
Wil Wagner, B.S., , Civitan International Research Center, UCEDD/LEND
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This presentation uses a computer program called Grimace to research emotion recognition in young adults, focusing on compound emotions and emotion intensity. Participants accurately recognized most of Grimace�s subtle facial expressions, and future research will examine Grimace�s potential as a tool for training emotion recognition in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

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"That Smart Pen sounded like it could be pretty helpful": A Thematic Analysis on Using Wireless Technology in the Workplace
Josephine Mhende, Masters of Public Health, , Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND
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Our research team interviewed individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities regarding their knowledge of and experiences with various types of available wireless technologies. Semi-structured focus-group interviews were conducted to understand participants? perceptions of the benefits of using wireless technology in the workplace and barriers to implementation. This session will present themes identified in analyses of focus-group transcripts. Results may guide efforts to support individuals with disabilities gain competitive integrated employment.

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Using Wireless Technologies to Facilitate Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Eliseo Jimenez, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Assistant Professor, College of Ed & Human Dev, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND
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We will present the results of a systematic review of current literature on using wireless technologies to support employment of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This research aimed to identify if and how these technologies support individuals with IDD to work successfully in integrated and inclusive work settings. This research also helps us understand what types of tasks individuals with IDD use wireless technology for in their work contexts.

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Effective Communication Enhances Community Inclusion: A Nation-wide Examination of Medicaid Coverage of iPads/Tablets
Samantha Costa, Bachelor of Science, , Center for Disabilities Studies, UCEDD/LEND
Beth Mineo, Ph.D., University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States, DE - Center for Disabilities Studies, UCEDD/LEND;

Although Medicaid coverage routinely extends to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices, that coverage rarely includes non-dedicated tablets/iPads. This presentation details a national investigation of state Medicaid policies relative to coverage of mainstream technology as a platform for AAC devices. Findings reveal that the majority of states do not cover these devices, and those that do impose restrictive eligibility criteria.

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Section 508 Compliance comes to Higher Education
Thomas Conway, PhD, Director of Communication, Center on Disability Studies, UCEDD/LEND
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Presentation reports on research with University faculty and the institutions' reckoning with current Section 508 technical accessibility regulations.

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Optimizing Learner Accessibility: adding American Sign Language (ASL) and Text-to-Talk to your online trainings.
Sarah Rulnick, MPH, Director, CANS Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND
John Rochford, MS, Worcester, MA, United States, MA - Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Derek Chaves, BS, Worcester, MA, United States, MA - Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Benjamin Amankwata, MS, Worcester, MA, United States, MA - Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Viet Do, MS, Worcester, MA, United States, MA - Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Mabelys Rodriguez, MS, Worcester, MA, United States, MA - Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND;

The Mass CANS on-line training and certification program is designed for clinicians who provide behavioral health services to Massachusetts children, youth, and their families. The learning styles, abilities, and primary language spoken among providers is quite diverse. We will discuss the recent addition of American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Text-To-Speech functionality to the web-based training including our process and the results.

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Supporting Self-Advocate Fellow in Distance Accessible LEND Program
Mary Alice Favro, MA, Training/Clinical Director, Vermont Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, LEND
Nicole LeBlanc, Autism Society, Disability Rights Network, SARTAC Fellow, Silver Springs, MD, United States, VT - Vermont Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, LEND;
Bidur Dahal, MS, Burlington, VT, United States, VT - Vermont Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, LEND;

Supporting self-advocate fellows is an important part of LEND programs and can be challenging when the self-advocate participates via remote access. This presentation describes VT LEND�s experience making their distance accessible training program fully inclusive for their first self-advocate fellow who lived out of state. The Self-Advocate Fellow, Educational Coach and Training/Clinical Director will provide information on how they met this goal successfully and dealt with challenges along the way.

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Included. Supported. Empowered: Using Traditional and Social Media to Tell the Stories of Inclusion
Gabrielle Sedor, B.A., Chief Operations Officer, ANCOR
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What does it take to be included, supported and empowered? That?s the story the ANCOR Foundation wants to tell through its 3-year national public awareness campaign. We?ll discuss the goals of the campaign, share its successes and challenges, discuss how an awareness campaign like this one paves the way for more inclusive communities moving forward, and leave audience members with free tools and resources to support their own efforts.


Instructing a Student with Down Syndrome Using Least-to-Most Prompting
Aaron Nielsen, Multicategorical Special Education K-12, M.A., Graduate Student, Center for Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND
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The purpose of this study is to gather information on a combination of task analysis, least-to-most prompting, chaining, and repetition as an instructional method to meet the needs of a student with Down syndrome. Data is collected on this educational approach to teaching a person with Down syndrome how to operate a technology-driven water bottle called Hidrate Spark 2.0.

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It's Magic - Augmenting reality to support connection, learning and employment
Kathryn Helland, MS, CCC-SLP, Director, Assistive Technology Programs, Institute on Disabilities, UCEDD
Kathryn Helland, MS , Philadelphia, PA, United States;

Explore the use of augmented reality to support learning and employment for people with I/DD, autism and other disabilities. Learn how to use this (often free) technology to make augmented reality supports to remember, organize, have fun, get a job done, complete a school assignment and more. Participants can actually use an application to create a viable AR support during the session.


Engaging Community Stakeholders: Conversations about Participation, Health and Well-being for Individuals with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities and Families
Teal Benevides, PhD, MS, OTR/L, Associate Professor, Augusta University
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We aimed to establish regional and national stakeholder groups to collaboratively engage in research development activities that inform community-level comparative effectiveness research focused on health outcomes of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). We have gathered and systematically analyzed information from three regional stakeholder meetings to identify research priorities and inform project outcomes.


Social Validity of Technology Assisted Language Intervention for Children who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing
Sandra Grether, PhD, Speech Language Pathologist III, University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND
Lisa Hunter, PhD, Cincinnati, OH, United States, OH - University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND;
Robert Gibler, MA, Cincinnati, OH, United States, OH - University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND;
Rajvi Desai, Cincinnati, OH, United States, OH - University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND;
Bethany Wysocki, Cincinnati, OH, United States, OH - University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND;
Jareen Meinzen-Derr, PhD, Cincinnati, OH, United States, OH - University of Cincinnati UCE, UCEDD/LEND;

Children who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) are at-risk for language delays and impairments. Technology Assisted Language Intervention (TALI) is a novel approach that focuses on using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) as an intervention for children who are DHH. Results from a pilot study suggest TALI may be viable for enhancing language development. We are studying the feasibility of this approach to supplement interventions for children who are DHH.

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Evaluating Spanish Language Access in State and Territory Assistive Technology Program Websites
Brian Grossman, ScM PhD, Assistant Professor, Disability Studies, Institute on Disability & Human Development, UCEDD/LEND
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We examined the 56 state and territory assistive technology (AT) program websites for the availability of Spanish-language content. Only Puerto Rico and nine state program websites provided information in Spanish. Population demographics (using American Community Survey data) did not predict the availability of Spanish-language access. Findings illustrate the need for increased AT outreach among Spanish-speaking populations and highlight opportunities for new partnerships to generate AT materials in Spanish.

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ACCESS Mobility: Influencing a Community
Amy Minnich, Bachelor of Arts, Assistive Technology Professional, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND
Katherine Joines, Bachelor of Science, Las Vegas, NV, United States, NV - Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND;
Yvonne Randall, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Henderson, NV, United States;
Tricia Catalino, PT, DSc, PCS, Las Vegas, NV, United States, NV - Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND;

Families and people with disabilities often have difficulty obtaining needed assistive technology due to the complexity of navigating the process, lack of financial resources, and/or inadequate professional competencies. The process of completing an environmental assessment, establishing a strategic plan for a community-based mobility clinic to reduce barriers, and future plans for implementation will be discussed in this poster presentation.

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How to make your poster accessible for all: Changing guidelines for academic posters
Susanna Miller-Raines, MSW, UCEDD Operations Coordinator, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND
Danny Housley, Tools for Life, Atlanta, GA, United States;
Erin Vinoski, MPH, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, United States;
Emily Graybill, Ph.D., Atlanta, GA, United States, GA - Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND;
Mark Crenshaw, MTS, Atlanta, GA, United States, GA - Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND;
Ken Mitchell, Atlanta, GA, United States, GA - Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND;

The purpose of this poster is to increase the accessibility of professional poster sessions for all people, including those with disabilities. Professional posters tend to be highly visual, text heavy with small font, include technical language, and require individuals to be comfortable standing next to the presenter while reading the poster. This may result in professional posters being inaccessible for many individuals.


Online Learning Accessibility: Empowering Teaching through Universal Design Principles
Shawn Wright, M.Ed, Online Learning Accessibility, Center on Disabilities and Human Development, UCEDD
Cari Murphy, Ph.D., ITC, Moscow, ID, United States;

The Center on Disabilities and Human Development at the University of Idaho has implemented an accessible Learning Management System and built a very successful course in introduction to creating accessible documents. The logical progression of training in accessible design is now to "train the trainer", that is, offer a set of online courses in how to design and develop online courses utilizing universal design principles.

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Three Years of Web Accessibility Data in the UCEDD Network: What are we learning?
Cyndi Rowland, Ph.D., Director, WebAIM, Center for Persons with Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND
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WebAIM conducted nationwide longitudinal research on web accessibility. It included every UCEDD, their host institutions and state government websites. The first two years of data in our sample were disappointing. How will year 3 fare? Others are doing better than UCEDDs yet we are charged with best practice, and contractually obligated by AIDD to produce accessible content. Trends and areas of work across our centers will be discussed.