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5/14/2010

Hearing & Hearing Loss

As of 2009, there are some 315 million people in the United States. Of those, it is estimated about 36 million have hearing loss. Although hearing loss is often associated with aging, hearing loss is clearly present in newborns, children, teenagers, young adults and adults. Healthy human ears can perceive an enormous range of sounds in terms of pitch and loudness. Hearing is the primary sense through which we learn speech and language. The ability to hear clearly from birth is extremely important with regard to normal development of speech and language skills, auditory processing skills, a sense of self, as well as normal emotional and psychological well-being and more.

 
 

5/14/2010

Other EHDI Related Information

 
 

5/14/2010

Professional associations

this link is related to the Early Hearing Detection & Intervention (EHDI) Program.

 
 

5/14/2010

State and Territory Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Program Contact List

(Updated March 11, 2010)
 
 

5/14/2010

State Related Websites

 
 

5/14/2010

Theory of Mind and Emotion Recognition in Children with Hearing Loss

Social behaviors, personal adjustment, emotion regulation, and emotion understanding can be adversely affected for children with hearing loss. These delays are influenced by speech and language ability, but other factors, such as emotion recognition and ToM, might influence development of social and emotional abilities in children with hearing loss as well. Emotion recognition, including the ability to discriminate the various expressions of emotions in facial, gestural, and verbal display, is not well defined for children with hearing loss. ToM refers to the understanding that people have intentions, desires, knowledge, and beliefs, and that these mental states might be different from their own and influence one?s behavior. This understanding underlies the development of many abilities that involve social cognition, including symbolic play, role-taking ability, and referential communication. Deaf children with hearing parents and those with cochlear implants are delayed in ToM development.

pdf File TN ER ToM poster ASHA 2009 11 15 09.pdf [download]
 
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