Core Curriculum: Florida

September 1, 1999

FLORIDA

09/01/1999

Interdisciplinary Course in Child Development
Mailman Center
University of Miami

Description: Providing supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families requires the knowledge and skills of professionals from many different disciplines and service agencies. As such, services are most effective when delivered through a system that efficiently unites professionals around the needs, strengths, and preferences of families. One such system found effective is interdisciplinary programming. Here, professionals from many disciplines (e.g. audiology, speech pathology, education, nutrition, clinical psychology, physical therapy, and social work) work together as a team, pooling information in order to collaboratively develop the necessary supports for the individual and his family.

Interdisciplinary service models have appeared in the social services and heath -related literature for several decades. However, it is generally conceded that a gap has existed between the conceptualization of interdisciplinary service delivery, and its actual implementation. An interdisciplinary approach builds on a foundation of disciplinary competence and with structured learning experiences, students develop additional skills required for effective participation in interdisciplinary processes. This implies recognizing interdependent relationships among disciplines and the centrality and the integrity of the family, and integrating this awareness into the practice of one's own discipline.

Interdisciplinary Course in Child Development is intended to provide an orientation to the interdisciplinary practices described above. This is achieved through an increased understanding of the individual disciplines as they relate to developmental disabilities as well as an understanding of the service systems available and necessary to provide the appropriate level of supports.

Targeted Students: Masters and Ph.D. level students in social work, psychology, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, nutrition, health administration and audiology.

Contact person: Paula Lalinde, Coordinator of Training
University of Miami, Mailman Center
P.O. Box 016820 D820
Miami, Florida 33101
plalinde@peds.med.miami.edu
Website: http://pediatrics.med.miami.edu/

Course Syllabus: Fall Semester, 1999
Offered through U M Psychology as 643-01
Offered through Nursing as Distant Independent Study at UM #690, FIU #5905, FAU #6905, Barry University #659
Offered through Barry University Social Work as #560

Class 1: Understanding Interdisciplinary Services Neurological Conditions in Children

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the components of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to serving children with neurodevelopmental disorders.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the benefits of using interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of brain development and overall structure of the brain.
  4. List major causes of brain injury.
  5. Describe consequences of brain injury as they relate to neurodevelopmental disorders.
  6. Identify components of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Content: This class begins by providing an interdisciplinary framework for understanding effective service delivery strategies when working with children with special health care needs and their families. The second part of this class provides a detailed discussion of neurological conditions in children. This includes the brain structure, causes of brain injury and consequences of brain injury as they relate to neurodevelopmental disorders. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention are reviewed from developmental and medical perspectives.

Methodology: Lecture, small group discussion, instructional video and slides

Presenter: Jeffrey P. Brosco, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Miami, School of Medicine

Class 2: Family-Centered Care and Service Coordination

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify legislative trends which influenced the evolution of family-centered care and service coordination.
  2. Identify components of service coordination as a model of service coordination.
  3. Identify key elements of family-centered care.
  4. Discuss the concept of the Family Support Plan.
  5. Identify elements of the Family Support Plan.
  6. Identify the phases of the Family Support Plan process.
  7. Discuss barriers to accessing services.

Content: Public Law 99-457 is examined as it relates to the foundations of current understandings and interpretations of family-centered care practices and service coordination. The family support plan process is reviewed to assist in the understanding of the key elements of family-centered care and how these key elements are incorporated into a planning process and service delivery model for young children and their families. Video vignettes of interactions between families and service providers are viewed and discussed to determine whether appropriate family-centered practices were employed.

Methodology: The format will include lecture, discussion, overheads and video vignettes.

Presenter: Paula Lalinde, M.A., Associate Coordinator of Training

Class 3: Public Policy as it Relates to Persons with Neurodevelopmental Disorders & Developmental Disabilities and Contemporary Philosophies of Inclusive Schools

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Discuss relationship between societal values, public policy, and allocation of resources.
  2. Identify major pieces of legislation for people with developmental disabilities.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the policy shifts during the past 50 years as they relate to people with disabilities.
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between inclusive school models and policy shifts.
  5. Discuss the advantages and perceived disadvantages of inclusive school settings.
  6. Identify the protections granted under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Individuals with Education Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act as it relates to accessibility and inclusive environments.
  7. Identify resources and referral agencies in our community, in the state, and nationwide.

Content: Three major shifts in public policy affecting individuals with developmental disabilities are discussed: institutionalization, deinstitutionalization, and the community membership period. Specific pieces of federal legislation are presented with a focus on the impact that consumers have had on the legislative process. Contemporary philosophies of inclusive education is presented with a focus on the young child and how this relates to the community membership period. Federal legislation including Section 504, IDEA, and ADA are discussed as they relate to inclusive environments and the protections they provide to children with disabilities and their families. Videos are shown to exemplify aspects of community membership, focusing on shifts in attitudes, communication, and inclusive settings for the young child.

Methodology: The format will include lecture, overheads, videos, a group activity, handouts, and class discussion.

Presenter: Paula Lalinde, MA, Associate Coordinator of Training, Mailman Center for Child Development; Susan Gold, Ed.D., Adjunct Professor, Mailman Center for Child Development

Class 4: Typical and Atypical Growth and Development: Hearing and Speech and Language

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the development of the sense of hearing from the physiological perspective.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of how the development of hearing influences language development.
  3. Discuss the importance of hearing with two ears instead of one.
  4. Identify the influence of various degrees of hearing loss.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences between "hearing" and "auditory processing".
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of auditory processing abilities on generalized learning abilities.
  7. Discuss the range of options available to children who have auditory processing problems.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of speech and language and the systems involved in production of speech.
  9. Identify "red flags" which indicate the need for referral for a speech and/or language evaluation.
  10. Discuss "low and high tech" technology for augmentative communication and the need for interdisciplinary evaluations in determining the best equipment.

Content: Students are provided with an overview of the anatomical and physiological nature of hearing, speech, and language development. Developmental linguistic milestones through the first three years of life is described as well as language development with respect to content, form and use. The impact of hearing loss on language development is discussed as well as how various other disabling conditions impact hearing, language and speech.

Methodology: Lecture, overheads, videotapes, slides, and class discussion.

Presenters: Robert Fifer, Ph.D., Director of Audiology and Speech and Language Pathology; Irit S. Greenberg, M.S., CCC-SLP

Class 5: The Dynamics Within a Family who has a Member with Developmental Disabilities/Cultural Diversity

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify psychosocial factors of a family who has a child with a disability: practical resources, emotional reactions, interpersonal relationships, and social roles.
  2. Examine family's copying strategies, including how families learn to connect with other families who have children with a disability.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how the dynamics of an entire family changes through meeting the needs of the member with a disability and how those dynamics may differ between cultural groups.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the common concerns of consumers of interdisciplinary services for children with developmental disabilities.

Content: Students will be provided with an understanding of the impact of a child with a disability on the entire family. This will include emotional reactions, family resources, social roles, and interpersonal relationships. Additionally, two parents who have a child with a disability share their life experiences and discuss how they have been empowered through their experiences and the successful coping mechanisms they have adopted. The presenters also discuss how they learned to access and negotiate the complex and confusing social service maze which encompasses local public schools, therapy providers and other social service agencies.

Methodology: Lecture, small group discussion, pictures, and pamphlets

Presenters: Robert Morgan, Ed.D., L.C.S.W., Director of Social Work, Mailman Center for Child Development; Janet Bell Taylor, Family Resource Specialist, Early Intervention Program, Mailman Center for Child Development; Elma Pierre, Family Resource Specialist, Early Intervention Program, Mailman Center for Child Development

Class 6: Growth and Development: Typical and Atypical Motor and Sensory- Motor Milestones

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the role of a physical therapist in interdisciplinary evaluations.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of typical motor and sensory motor milestones in young children.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of atypical motor and sensory motor milestones in young children.
  4. Describe how a physical therapist interprets the evaluation results to determine whether or not therapy is indicated.
  5. Describe three types of muscle tone.
  6. Briefly describe four types of cerebral palsy according to tone and limb involvement.

Content: Students are provided with an overview of the typical motor and sensory motor milestones through the first three years of life. The role of a physical therapist is discussed as it relates to interdisciplinary teaming and the provision of physical therapy services to young children with motor and sensory motor delays. Cerebral palsy is discussed as a common neuro-developmental disorder and how it effects a child's muscle tone and limb mobility.

Methodology: Lecture, slides, and class discussion.

Presenter: Rose Rine, Ph.D., University of Miami, Division of Physical Therapy

Class 7: Health Administration; Budgeting and Finance Health Care Reform: Impact on Patients and Professionals

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the major health care systems that serve children with special health care needs.
  2. Identify common concerns of parents of children with special health care needs in accessing health care services.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the billing and collection process in the managed care system.
  4. Identify billing issues which are routine.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of IDX, as an enterprise-wide computerized information system.

Content: Children with special health care needs access health services through a host of complex and rapidly changing health care options. Title V programs in Florida, through Children's Medical Services is discussed as well as new initiatives, Alternative Services Network and Kids Kare. Common concerns in accessing health care services among parents who have children with special health care are discussed. The billing and collection process in the managed care system is described with specific information about the widely used IDX information system.

Class 8: Developmental Outcomes of High-Risk Infants Impact of Nutrition Therapies: Physical, Social and Emotional

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the variables which can affect developmental outcomes of the premature infant.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the complex interaction between medical and psychosocial variables.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the reasons why prediction of outcome is difficult for neonatologists.
  4. Describe the Florida Newborn Screening Program.
  5. Discuss general concepts of nutritional management of PKU and Galactosemia.
  6. Discuss potential child/family reactions to nutritional therapy for an Inborn Error of Metabolism.

Content: This two-part lecture, first describes the factors affecting the increased survival of premature infants. A range of factors which contribute to the developmental outcome of high risk infants are discussed, including medical, social, and environmental factors. The second part includes a description of the Florida Newborn Screening program and nutritional management of a carbohydrate and protein metabolic disorder is presented. A family member of a child with a metabolic disorder will discuss how nutritional therapy impacts the child and their family.

Methodology: Lecture, slides and discussion.

Presenters: June Pimm, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Miami; Sheah Rarback, M.S.,R.D., Mailman Center for Child Development and a parent of a child with an Inborn Error of Metabolism

Class 9: Assistive Technology: Enhancing the Lives of Individuals with Disabilities (Tour)

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Define the term "Assistive Technology".
  2. Discuss availability and use of assistive technology.
  3. Discuss the users of assistive technology.
  4. Discuss resources for assistive technology.

Content: Through a tour of an assistive technology demonstration apartment, the students learn about high and low tech assistive technology.

Methodology: Tour of Florida Alliance for Assistive Technology (FAAST) Demonstration Apartment, video and group discussion.

Presenter: Beth Kofsky, Director of FAAST

Class 10: The Adult and Aging Individual with Developmental Disabilities

Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  1. Describe Florida's current Developmental Services system, including person-centered planning and the multi-faceted role of a Waiver support coordinator.
  2. Identify some of the changing needs of adults with disabilities as they grow older.
  3. Compare age-related physical changes in individuals having Down Syndrome with those of individuals with other types of mental retardation.
  4. Explain the differences between the Aging and Disability service networks, regarding the scope, purpose and eligibility for services.
  5. List some of the services offered for adults with disabilities by the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF).
  6. Describe the role of an Area Agency on Aging in the provision of local services.
  7. Explain the use of an Elder Helpline for service information and referrals.
  8. Understand the need for collaboration and coordination of services between the aging and disability systems, including generic community and naturally-occurring supports.
  9. Describe some of the concerns of elderly parents who continue to provide care for a grown son or daughter (with a developmental disability) in the family home.
  10. Explain why people with developmental disabilities have the right to a retirement.

Content: In order to be effective service providers, professionals must be aware of the wide array of services and supports available for persons with disabilities. They must also be cognizant, however, of the experience and changing needs of a person with a disability at different points across the lifespan. Similarly, from a family systems perspective, there must be an awareness of the impact of these changes upon the family unit, especially the aging parents. Professionals can be more creative advocates if they understand these changing needs, as well as the realities of the limitations of the formal service systems. Finally, professionals have an obligation to stay current with evolving practices and shifting paradigms in Florida's social and health services. Acknowledging all of these issues, the class presents an overview and introduction to each one.

Methodology: This class offers both experiential and didactic presentations, including a walking tour of the local United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) adult vocational and senior activity programs. The subsequent classroom lecture is supplemented by questions and answers from students' personal and professional experiences. Audiovisual materials are also employed, included a videotape describing physical aging changes and showing seniors with developmental disabilities enjoying leisure and recreational pursuits within a senior center setting.

Presenters: Jean Sherman, Ed.D., R.N., UCP staff/consumers with disabilities