Tony Simon, PhD

Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at the UC Davis MIND Institute
UC Davis Health System
2825 50th Street
Sacramento, CA 95817
 
Phone: 916-703-0407
Email: tjsimon@ucdavis.edu
Login to Update Your Profile
Last Updated: June 28, 2013

Tony Simon
 

Project/Program/Clinic Contacts: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Research Programs
 
Discipline(s): Psychiatry
Genetics/Genetic Counseling
Psychology
 
AUCD Council Membership: No Council Membership
 
Research: Dr. Simon is a Professor in Residence. His focuses on the neural basis of cognitive impairments seen in genetic disorders that produce mental retardation, developmental disability and psychopathology. Building on his influential theory of the foundations of numerical competence, Dr. Simon investigates how dysfunction in specific neurocognitive processing systems, such as attention and spatial cognition, can generate a range of cognitive and behavioral impairments. His goal is to develop remedial intervention programs that will minimize such disability. Dr. Simon's current projects center on studies of visuospatial and numerical cognition in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as DiGeorge and VeloCardioFacial syndrome. He is also engaged in similar studies of children with fragile X, Klinefelter and Trisomy X syndromes. Besides cognitive processing analyses and psychometric testing, Dr. Simon uses cutting edge neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Voxel Based Morphometrics, and Diffusion Tensor Fiber Tracking in order to study the structure, function and connective patterns in the developing brain.
Education: B.A. Psychology, Lancashshire Polytechnic, UK, 1981
Ph.D. Developmental Psychology, Sheffield University, UK, 1985

Vita/Bio

Tony J. Simon, Ph.D.

Associate Professor In-Residence
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute
2825 50th St.
Sacramento, CA 95817
Office phone: (916) 703-0407
E-mail: tjsimon@ucdavis.edu

Dr. Simon is a pediatric cognitive neuroscientist. His research focuses on the neural basis of cognitive impairments seen in genetic disorders that produce mental retardation, developmental disability and psychopathology. Building on his influential theory of the foundations of numerical competence, Dr. Simon investigates how dysfunction in specific neurocognitive processing systems, such as attention and spatial cognition, can generate a range of cognitive and behavioral impairments. His goal is to develop remedial intervention programs that will minimize such disability. Dr. Simon's current projects center on studies of visuospatial and numerical cognition in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as DiGeorge and VeloCardioFacial syndrome. He is also engaged in similar studies of children with Fragile X, Williams, and Turner syndromes. Besides cognitive processing analyses and psychometric testing, Dr. Simon uses cutting edge neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Voxel Based Morphometrics, and Diffusion Tensor Fiber Tracking in order to study the structure, function and connective patterns in the developing brain.

Education

B.A.

Psychology, Lancashshire Polytechnic, UK, 1981

Ph.D.

Developmental Psychology, Sheffield University, UK, 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tony J. Simon Ph.D.

Publications

2004 Bish JP, Nguyen V, Ding L., Ferrante S, & Simon TJ: Thalamic reductions in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. NeuroReport, 15, 1413-1415.

2005 Simon TJ, Bearden CE, McDonald-McGinn D, & Zackai E: Visuospatial and numerical cognitive deficits in children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome. Cortex, 41:131-141.

2005 Bish JP, Ferrante S, McDonald-McGinn D, Zackai EH, & Simon TJ: Maladaptive conflict monitoring as evidence for executive dysfunction in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Developmental Science, 8:36-43.

2005 Simon TJ, Ding L, Bish JP, McDonald-McGinn D, Zackai E, & Gee J: Volumetric, connective and morphologic changes in the brains of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: An integrative study. NeuroImage, 25:169-180.

2005 Bearden CE, Jawad AF, Lynch DR, Monterosso JR, Sokol S, McDonald-McGinn D, Saitta S, Harris S, Moss EM, Wang PP, Zackai E, Emanuel BS, & Simon TJ: Effects of COMT genotype on behavioral symptomatology in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Child Neuropsychology, 11(1), 109-117.