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AUCD - Poster Symposium: Surveillance and Developmental Monitoring

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Monday, December 5, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location: Congressional Hall B

Session Description

 

AUCD poster symposia seek to deepen levels of engagement and connection between those interested in common topics. Posters have been hand-selected by a review committee and grouped by room around common themes. Facilitators will open each poster symposia with broad thoughts about the room's theme followed by a brief 2-3 minute presentation by each poster presenter, approximately 15 per room. Attendees will then have time for more in-depth exploration of the information presented and make connections with others in the room. Attendees are attend to select one symposia to attend during each time slot as space allows; pre-registration is not required.




Presenters

Navigating Change: Developmental Monitoring in the U.S. Virgin Islands
Karen Brown, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Associate Director , Virgin Islands UCE, UCEDD
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This session will provide attendees with information about program objectives and activities related to promoting the CDC's Learn the Signs. Act Early. campaign and engaging parents in a systematic developmental monitoring process through coordinated efforts by partner agencies charged with serving young children and their families.

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Acting Early in Montana: Big Steps Under the Big Sky
Martin Blair, PhD, Executive Director, University of Montana Rural Institute, UCEDD
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A collaborative effort between the UCEDD, Act Early Ambassador and 50+ provider, state agency, family and university partners in a large rural state is generating strong "Act Early Outcomes." We will describe strategic partnerships and unique approaches to encouraging awareness, early screening and diagnosis, and early intervention for autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities.

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National Autism Data Center: Using population-level data to inform national-level solutions
Paul Shattuck, PhD, Leader, Life Course Outcomes Research Program, A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University
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Billions are spent annually on services for people with autism in the U.S. Yet, limited population-level findings exist describing whether we are meeting needs, improving outcomes, and impacting lives. We detail the activities and successes of the National Autism Data Center which provides rigorous analysis of population-level data and dissemination of accessible information designed for those who make decisions, legislate, and plan programs for youth and adults with autism.


Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in an Under-served Community: Who Refers and Why?
Lisa Shulman, MD, Director of EI and Autism Services, Rose F. Kennedy Center, UCEDD/LEND
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Early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has become an important public health goal. But disparities exist regarding who achieves an early diagnosis. We looked at success stories of children In a low SES/minority setting who achieved an early diagnosis: Who referred them? Why were they referred? Answers to these questions form a basis of exploring strategies for facilitating an early diagnosis of ASD for all affected children.

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Not by screening alone: Developmental monitoring and screening together best predict which 3 to 5 year olds receive help
Brian Barger, PhD, Assistant Professor, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND
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Data from the National Surveys of Children�s Health (NSCH; 2007; 2011/2012) is presented indicating that developmental screening paired with developmental monitoring is associated with the receipt of early childhood special education and community based mental health treatment. When received alone developmental monitoring and/or screening were either weakly or unassociated with treatment receipt. Findings indicate that developmental screening alone may be insufficient to identify children in need of treatment.


Rhode Island's Early Childhood Screening Initiatives and Resources
Stacey Aguiar, MPH, CHES, Early Childhood Project & Quality Improvement Mgr , RI Department of Health
Stacey Aguiar, MPH, CHES, RI Department of Health, Providence, RI, United States;

An overview of 1) Screening to Succeed, which supports primary care providers with financial resources and on-site technical assistance, to implement electronic standardized developmental screening and link families with appropriate resources. 2) LAUNCH, which supports children to succeed in school by building social-behavioral capacities into community-based childhood systems of care in order to promote and integrate physical and behavioral health wellness. 3) Customized "Learn the Signs. Act Early." materials.

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Differences in the Behavioral Phenotype of ASD in a Population Sample of Somali, White, Non-Somali Black, and Hispanic Children.
Libby Hallas-Muchow, Project Coordinator, Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND
Amy Esler, PhD, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Jennifer Hall-Lande, PhD, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Kristin Hamre, MPH, MSW, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Jen Poynter, PhD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States;
Anab Gulaid, MPA, MA, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Libby Hallas-Muchow, MS, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Amy Hewitt, PhD, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;

Presents results from a public health surveillance project in Minneapolis on ASD in Somali children compared to non-Somali children. Using a multi-step records review, the project identified differences in characteristics of ASD across racial and ethnic groups. Somali children were more likely to have ASD + intellectual disability than children in all other racial and ethnic groups. Group differences in ASD symptom patterns and co-occurring behaviors are described.

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Disparities in medical home access for children with special health care needs across all 50 states.
Rebecca Wells, MSW, MPH, Doctoral Fellow, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND
Brian Barger, PhD, Atlanta, GA, GA - Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND;
Daniel Crimmins, PhD, Atlanta, GA, GA - Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University, UCEDD/LEND;

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children receive care that is family and patient-centered, comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible from a medical home. Medical homes are especially important for Children with Special Healthcare Needs (CSHCN). This presentation will explore disparities in medical home access that exist between CSHCN and non-CSHCN across all 50 states, Washington DC, and nationally.

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Reducing Disability Stigma in the Arab-American Population by Introducing the �Learn the Signs. Act Early� campaign.
Louma Sebaihi, BSN, Nurse, Center for Excellence in Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND
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Disability is taboo in the Arab-American population. Many have difficulty seeking help and accepting the final diagnosis because of stigma. Early diagnosis and intervention is critical for best outcomes so it is essential to address stigma and help parents act early. This presentation will review our efforts to introduce the world of disability to this population using the "Learn the Signs. Act Early" campaign.


Building more inclusive school-based public health surveys: Increasing participation of youth with disabilities in the Youth Tobacco Survey
Eileen Sparling, Ed.M., Program Manager, Center for Disabilities Studies, UCEDD/LEND
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Students in special education classrooms or disability-specific schools are systematically excluded from school-based health surveys. This presentation will: 1) share Delaware data on the patterns of exclusion; 2) report on pilot testing of previously excluded populations using accommodations including an electronic version of the survey with ALS video; 3) share a model accommodation protocol and 4) provide recommendations for states working toward a more inclusive public health surveillance program.

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Understanding the Present to Leverage the Future for Children and Youth with ASD/DD: Highlights from Three State Planning Projects
Elaine Gabovitch, MPA, Instructor/Family Faculty, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, UCEDD/LEND
Elizabeth Collins, MSN, BSN, BA, NH DHHS, Concord, NH, United States;
Pauline Filipek, MD, Houston, TX, United States, TX - The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHSC) - IDDRC;

Panelists from Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Texas will share information about three state autism planning projects designed to assess current needs and establish future surveillance plans for systems of services for children and youth with autism spectrum and other developmental disorders. Panelists will discuss their state autism plans, including their methods, outcome data, follow-up activities, lessons learned, and future recommendations.

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Key Decisions and Pivot Points: The Path to Successful Developmental Monitoring Using ?Learn the Signs. Act Early? with Childcare Professionals
Alexandra Puk, M.S., Project Coordinator, Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND
Gail Chodron, Ph.D., Madison, WI, WI - Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Sandy Tierney, Ph.D., Madison, WI, WI - Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Kris Barnekow, Ph.D., OTR/L, Milwaukee, WI;

This poster presents key factors and decisions leading to successful implementation of developmental monitoring using the CDC's "Learn the Signs. Act Early." resources in childcare settings. Drawing on qualitative data from a 9-month site-based training and technical assistance intervention, findings reveal factors that enabled or hindered intended use of the training and materials in childcare settings. Key decision points impacting success of implementation are discussed.


Impact of Technical Assistance on Implementation and Outcomes of Developmental Monitoring Using "Learn the Signs. Act Early." in Childcare Settings
Alexandra Puk, M.S., Project Coordinator, Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND
Gail Chodron, Ph.D., Madison, WI, WI - Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Sandy Tierney, Ph.D., Madison, WI, WI - Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND;
Kris Barnekow, Ph.D., OTR/L, Milwaukee, WI;

This poster presents how technical assistance impacts implementation of a research-based program to improve developmental monitoring using the CDC's "Learn the Signs. Act Early." resources in childcare settings. Findings compare implementation and maintenance of developmental monitoring between early care and education providers that received either 1) online training only; or 2) online training plus 9 months of technical assistance. Implications for future technical assistance strategies are discussed.


Promoting Developmental Monitoring and Referral Using the �Learn the Signs. Act Early.� Campaign!
Deana Buck, M.Ed, Early Childhood Team Leader, Partnership for People with Disabilities, UCEDD/LEND
Jennifer Hall-Lande, Ph.D, Minneapolis, MN, United States, MN - Institute on Community Integration, UCEDD/LEND;
Gail Chodron, Ph.D, Madison, WI, United States, WI - Waisman Center, UCEDD/LEND;

Increasing the capacity of early childhood providers is a promising way to improve the early identification of young children with developmental concerns. Act Early Ambassadors from three states will describe successes promoting developmental monitoring using the "Learn the Signs. Act Early� and �Birth to Five. Watch Me Thrive� national campaigns. Participants will also describe collaborative efforts within the UCEDD and LEND networks.

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Association between Disability and Physical Inactivity: Measurement and Surveillance
dana mcguire, DPT, PhD, Physical Therapist, Epidemiologist, CDC
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Adults with disabilities are consistently more likely to be physically inactive; however, little is known about how the questions used to measure disability can influence findings. This presentation examines national-level prevalence of inactivity among adults with disability using two measures of disability from the National Health Interview Survey. It is important to know how disabilities are defined and consider the implications on findings and strategies which can reduce potential barriers.

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